ISS 2017 Program
 

 


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IC69: Sip'n Puff: A Thing of the Past?

This presentation will take a whimsical look at pneumatic switch systems for power seating and mobility. Are pneumatic controls a thing of the past and soon to be extinct? A pneumatic switch (sip and puff for you clinical folks) is one option that can serve as a very functional means of operating a power wheelchair. As clinicians and ATPs, are we maximizing the clients function and safety by fine tuning the programming adjustments to ensure that our clients can utilize the full potential of their power wheelchair when controlled with a pneumatic switch system. Attendees will be introduced to the basic operation of power wheelchairs and power seating through pneumatic controls. Attendees will be encouraged to discuss the advantages and disadvantages of pneumatic drive system, programming functions and alternative drive control systems for various power wheelchairs. We will compare and contrast alternative control devices currently available for individuals who are unable to use a standard joystick control system. Case studies will be used to demonstrate the development of wheelchair skills using pneumatic controls.

 

Learning Objectives:

Upon completion of this session, attendees will be able to;

 

Faculty:

David J Kreutz, PT, ATP
Shepherd Center
Atlanta, Georgia
United States

Mr. Kreutz is a physical therapist at the Shepherd Center. He serves as the manager of the Seating and Mobility Clinic Guest lecturer at Emory University, Georgia State University, Mercer University and Armstrong University on the topic of seating and mobility. Presented on topics including: wheelchair seating, pressure mapping, manual and power wheelchair mobility, and funding at the International Seating Symposium, Canadian Seating and Mobility Conference.

Chris Maurer, MPT, ATP
Shepherd Center
Atlanta, GA
United States


Chris Maurer is a physical therapist who has worked at the Shepherd Center for the past 22 years in the outpatient, spinal cord injury rehab, and the seating clinic. She has worked clinically in seating and mobility for 17 years as well as participating in clinical research seating and mobility. She has co-authored book chapters and peer reviewed research articles.

Mark Partridge, RRTS
Numotion
Atlanta, GA
United States

 

References:

    1. Fehr, L., Langbein, W., & Skaar, S. (2000). Adequacy of power wheelchair control interfaces for persons with severe disabilities: A clinical survey. J Rehabil Res Dev, 37(3), 353-360.
    2. Lange, M. (2015, March). Power Wheelchairs: An Overview of Advanced Features. OccupationalTherapy.com, (2479). Retrieved from http://OccupationalTherapy.com.
    3. Kim, J., Park, H., Bruce, J., Sutton, E., Rowles, D., Pucci, D., . . . Ghovanloo, M. (2013). The Tongue Enables Computer and Wheelchair Control for People with Spinal Cord Injury. Science Translational Medicine, 5(213).



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